5 Ways To Beat Pregnancy Indigestion

Some women’s pregnancy heartburn persists for long period of time. Other women experience severe, debilitating pain. Either situation can cause difficulty breathing, arm and jaw pain, and extreme chest pain. As we said above, if you experience either of these, it is important to talk to your midwife or doctor immediately.

Skip the three big squares. Six small meals are the solution to many pregnancy symptoms, from heartburn to bloating to lagging energy. Don’t drink and eat at the same time.

During pregnancy, the stomach has prolonged gastric emptying times and the gastroesophageal sphincter has decreased tone. Together, these changes lead to reflux and possibly combine with decreased esophageal tone to cause ptyalism, or spitting, during pregnancy as well as reflux and heartburn. There are certain foods that double as natural remedies for heartburn during pregnancy. Some of these home remedies for heartburn during pregnancy may work well for certain women but not for others. Find out what works best for you among these foods that help with heartburn during pregnancy.

When we eat, food passes down the gullet (oesophagus) into the stomach. Cells in the lining of the stomach make acid and other chemicals which help to digest food. Dyspepsia (indigestion) is a term which includes a group of symptoms (detailed below) that come from a problem in your upper gut.

This weakness resolves after delivery. Medications that may be safe for pregnant women to relieve heartburn include antacids, alginic acid/antacid combinations, and sucralfate. Antacids may interfere with iron absorption, and iron is important for the growing fetus so pregnant women may need iron supplementation. You are more likely to get indigestion if you are very full, so regularly eating large amounts of food may make your symptoms worse.

You probably won’t be able to get through your entire pregnancy without a little heartburn. But, while it may be annoying, leave you with a bad taste in your mouth, or disrupt your sleep, it’s usually not harmful. You can try your best to prevent it, and then take steps to cope with it when it pops up.

  • Be sure to talk to your doctor about any symptoms you’re experiencing, so they can determine if it’s heartburn.
  • During pregnancy, the hormone progesterone causes the valve to relax, which can increase the frequency of heartburn.
  • Don’t wear belts or clothes that are tight fitting around the waist.
  • Although the exact reasons aren’t clear, most experts believe that pregnancy hormones, particularly progesterone, play a role.

Some medicines may make symptoms worse. It is unlikely that pregnant women would be taking any of these medicines, but check with your doctor if you think medication you are on could be making your symptoms worse. If symptoms return on most nights, it may help to go to bed with an empty, dry stomach. To do this, don’t eat in the last three hours before bedtime and don’t drink in the last two hours before bedtime.

Antacids may interfere with iron absorption, and iron is important for the growing fetus. Pregnant women usually receive supplemental iron and a slight decrease in iron absorption (considering the use of supplements) should not result in a deficiency of iron. Insufficient iron intake or absorption is easily detected in blood tests as iron deficiency anemia.

Additionally, as the weeks go on and your belly gets bigger, your expanding uterus and growing baby begin to put pressure on your stomach. This pressure can push the contents of the stomach past the weakened sphincter and up into the esophagus, also leading to heartburn. Progesterone causes the stomach to empty more slowly after you eat while relaxin calms or relaxes the smooth muscle in your body. The ring, or sphincter, around the bottom of the esophagus that keeps the food and stomach acid in your stomach, is made up of smooth muscle. It may burn, but it doesn’t have anything to do with your heart.

Attention to diet and lifestyle may help to ease symptoms. Antacids are commonly used. A medicine which prevents your stomach from making acid may be prescribed if symptoms remain troublesome. More than half of all pregnant women report symptoms of severe heartburn, particularly during their second and third trimesters. Heartburn, also called acid indigestion, is an irritation or burning sensation of the esophagus caused by stomach contents that reflux (comes back up) from the stomach.

how to relieve indigestion while pregnant

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