I get indigestion every time I eat, should I be concerned?

Symptoms of indigestion can include feeling sick, pain at the top of the abdomen (dyspepsia) or behind the breastbone (heartburn) and lots of burping. Indigestion is often caused by acid reflux, which occurs when stomach acid leaks back up into your gullet (oesophagus) and irritates its lining.

pylori can cause dyspepsia without forming an ulcer. A look at emotional eating when people use food to cope with emotions, such as stress. Included is detail on the causes and common triggers to avoid.

Nevertheless, people often associate their symptoms with specific foods (such as salads and fats). Although specific foods might worsen the symptoms of indigestion, they usually are not the cause of indigestion. (Intolerance to specific foods, for example, lactose intolerance [milk] and allergies to wheat, eggs, soy, and milk protein are not considered functional diseases like indigestion).

It is possible that drinking water could relieve some symptoms. to fully familiarise yourself with the discomfort. One of the main causes of indigestion is eating, which makes your stomach produce acid. This acid can irritate your stomach lining, the top part of your bowel or your Oesophagus. It is not unheard of for women to crave a curry during pregnancy but eating lots of spicy, fatty or rich food can make indigestion worse.

hungry with indigestion

Another important cause of indigestion is drugs. Many drugs are frequently associated with indigestion, for example, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen), antibiotics, and estrogens). In fact, most drugs are reported to cause indigestion in at least some people with functional symptoms. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection of the stomach.

It is a chronic disease in which the symptoms fluctuate in frequency and intensity usually over many months or years. It may occur every day or intermittently for days or weeks at a time followed by days or weeks of relief (a pattern referred to as periodicity). While occasional heartburn or indigestion happens to most people at some point, symptoms that occur frequently or over an extended period of time need to be evaluated by your doctor, as they could indicate a serious illness.

Antacids are commonly used. A medicine which prevents your stomach from making acid may be prescribed if symptoms remain troublesome. YES!

Heartburn, or that burning sensation typically located just behind or below the breastbone, is caused by acid reflux — the upward splashing of acidic contents of the stomach back into the esophagus. The resulting irritation of the esophagus creates burning symptoms that are often accompanied by other symptoms, such as a sour taste in the mouth, regurgitation and belching. Technically, the word heartburn can refer specifically to the chest discomfort. However, many people talk about their heartburn, indigestion and any accompanying symptoms together as a single problem. Indigestion has many different causes and doctors don’t always find out what’s causing the symptoms.

Even to this day, I get the two sensations (acid reflux and hunger) confused. That’s because the brain finds it hard to distinguish whether pain is coming from the heart or from the stomach and oesophagus. It can be hard to know the difference and, if you are really worried, it’s best to seek urgent medical help. A heart attack may start when you’re exerting yourself – using a treadmill or having sex, for instance. It will usually be a pressure, ache or tight band of pain on the left side of your chest.

You may need to take antibiotics to kill off the bacteria and proton pump inhibitors to reduce the amount of acid your stomach makes. If antacids don’t work, or you need to take them regularly to ease your symptoms, your pharmacist may recommend a proton pump inhibitor.

However, the risk of gastric cancer is extremely low in patients under the age of 55 years presenting with the new onset of dyspepsia in most Western countries including Britain. Furthermore, “alarm” symptoms such as weight loss, dysphagia, or anaemia help to identify those who need to be investigated in order to exclude malignancy, although between 15% and 50% of dyspeptic patients with gastric cancer do not have these symptoms. Endoscopic evaluation is therefore recommended in older patients presenting with new symptoms and in all patients with alarm symptoms.

This disease can eventually lead to more serious health problems. You may be wondering how your acid reflux can make you nauseated. Several factors are responsible. Many of them relate to how acid reflux happens.

Eating healthful foods including whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, are recommended to alleviate hunger pains. Hunger pains feel like a gnawing or rumbling in the stomach. They may also present as contractions or the feeling of emptiness. People may mistake their brain signals for food as hunger pains in some cases. This situation can occur when someone is in a heightened emotional state.

Raw onions, say in a salad, can also cause pain to creep in after a meal. There is no one cause of indigestion in pregnancy – it’s a mix of hormones, your expanding womb pressing on your stomach and relaxing of muscles in the oesophagus which can let acid move back out of the stomach. If you have GERD, your doctor may encourage you to take over-the-counter antacids. They may also prescribe medications such as proton pump inhibitors or H2 blockers, which can reduce the amount of acid in your stomach and help relieve symptoms. They may also recommend changes such as weight loss or elevating the head of your bed six inches.

Reassurance and explanation remain the key elements in managing documented or suspected functional dyspepsia. Patients should be advised that this is a real condition and that their symptoms are not imaginary.

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