Is It GERD? Recognizing Atypical Symptoms

Nighttime heartburn may be particularly dangerous. Waking up with a sour taste in the mouth, coughing, or sore throat may indicate nighttime acid reflux. Not only does it disturb sleep, but the esophagus may sustain more damage. That’s because when you are lying down for several hours, acid has a lot of time to linger in the esophagus and damage the tissue. When we are awake, we swallow saliva throughout the day.

The surgeon described it as a grade one (the lowest of 4 grades, I believe). Nevertheless, he has instructed me to double up on the PPI at least until he schedules a repeat endoscopy in 6 months (and I strongly suspect he will then recommend my staying on that regimen for life.) He claims that many my age (77) are on this dosage of a proton pump inhibitor for the long term without ill effect, and he says my complete lack of symptoms is due to the fact that my reflux does not reach high enough for me to be aware of it. Still, I am very apprehensive about this high dosage every day, although after a week on this increased dosage I have experienced only slight, intermittent stomach pain but more frequent nighttime bloating and gas.

Others may be able to consume these beverages in moderation without affecting their condition. Experiment a bit and do what’s right for you. The types of food you eat may cause digestive discomfort. If you are prone to acid reflux, avoid eating spicy foods, acidic foods, and other foods that trigger reflux because they relax the LES.

But relief is only temporary. Over-the-counter antacids do not prevent symptoms from returning or rarely allow an injured esophagus to heal. If you need antacids for more than 2 weeks, talk with your health-care professional to get a better diagnosis of your condition and appropriate investigation and treatment. Talk to your health-care professional if you take over-the-counter pain relievers such as aspirin and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin).

Not a pretty sight. I find myself becoming more and more despondent.

A heart attack is a medical emergency, so being able to tell the difference between heartburn and cardiac chest pain is crucial. If chest pain spreads to other areas of the body, such as the arms or jaw, or occurs alongside symptoms such as shortness of breath and a feeling of tightness in the chest, it might be a sign of a heart attack. If chest pain lasts for more than a few minutes, call 911 immediately. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can cause heartburn, which is a common type of noncardiac chest pain. Chest pain can be a sign that a person is having a heart attack.

Over time, these deposits can restrict blood flow, which can cause a type of chest pain called angina. CAD can also lead to heart attacks and heart failure.

There are several foods and beverages that are linked to causing symptoms of GERD (i.e. heartburn) and linked to making the symptoms worse. Physicians suggest people with GERD should avoid these foods along with other foods or activities that have been linked to causing symptoms in the specific individual. The LES is a ring of muscle fibers that functions to close the opening between the esophagus and the stomach.

Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is usually caused by the ring of muscle at the bottom of the oesophagus (gullet) becoming weakened. If you also have asthma, the symptoms may get worse as a result of stomach acid irritating your airways.

Myocarditis is a rare form of cardiovascular disease that causes inflammation of the heart muscle. This inflammation can lead to chest pain, heart failure, or sudden death.

A common symptom of a heart attack is pain or discomfort that typically occurs in the center or left side of the chest. This pain may come and go, and its severity can range from mild to severe. It can also sometimes feel like heartburn or indigestion. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, a person who experiences acid reflux more than twice a week for a few weeks may have GERD.

gerd and chest pain symptoms

I had constant heartburn, burning stomach aches, burning mouth; I always felt nauseous and I was constantly chewing on antacids, which did not help. Then I was no longer able to eat any foods or keep anything down. My doctor refused to listen to me and told me that young people do not have intestinal disorders and that I simply had an eating disorder since I was losing weight. However, the symptoms continued to control my life, I felt sick everyday, and I lost 20lbs.

I am now 43 and had not had any symptoms or issues with heartburn or any other symptom associated with GERD again until 9 months ago. I had trouble with food and it felt like the food was getting stuck in my throat. I went to see an ENT and was treated for acid reflux, but that brought back the memory of my GERD diagnosis some 15 years prior.

gerd and chest pain symptoms

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